MacDonald Drive Elementary

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MacDonald Drive Elementary is a Grade K-6 school located in St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador. We have a student population of approximately 500, which includes many cultures, languages, and nationalities. We have a strong sense of community and promote a responsibility to self, others, and the world.

 

Learn more about us HERE

The Bulletin Board in our main entrance changes every month or so. This month we are focusing on the many countries that make up the population of our school. All teachers discuss the variety of cultures and countries represented within their own classroom and then submit them to our gym teacher, who then represents the countries identified with colourful push pins on the map of the world. The caption: "The World Comes Together at MDE" helps children to relate their unique connection within the school to that of the world, in general. Children from every classroom can be heard and/or seen pointing out their place in the world as well as commenting on all the places we represent in our own school. This activity relates to global citizenship because it helps children to see how they, as a school, represent many of the countries in our world. It directly relates our diverse cultures to that of the world, in general. Pretty impressive to see. And, the student-generated comments and discussions related to it are reaffirming as they all feel interconnected and appreciated as members of our school.

The Bulletin Board in our main entrance changes every month or so. This month we are focusing on the many countries that make up the population of our school. All teachers discuss the variety of cultures and countries represented within their own classroom and then submit them to our gym teacher, who then represents the countries identified with colourful push pins on the map of the world. The caption: "The World Comes Together at MDE" helps children to relate their unique connection within the school to that of the world, in general. Children from every classroom can be heard and/or seen pointing out their place in the world as well as commenting on all the places we represent in our own school.

This activity relates to global citizenship because it helps children to see how they, as a school, represent many of the countries in our world. It directly relates our diverse cultures to that of the world, in general. Pretty impressive to see. And, the student-generated comments and discussions related to it are reaffirming as they all feel interconnected and appreciated as members of our school.

Upon entering our school, all teachers, students, parents, and visitors are immersed in a multicultural atmosphere. The colourful mural of children (painted by previous students) on the wall, along with the poster above it, communicate our appreciation of the diverse cultures in our student population and the world, in general. Discussion generated about the importance and meaning of the words and images was very rich, enlightening, and for many, reaffirming of their individual place within the whole of the school-we all belong. Now every time we walk by, children not only look but realize the meaning and importance of what they are seeing. This activity connects to the foundation of global citizenship as the children are able to see themselves in the images of the mural. They recognize the diversity amongst themselves and were able to connect the variety of student cultures in our one school to the different colours and textures of the peels on the one apple. They also made links to the world, in general. They understand that all of the children are interconnected within our school just like our world is made up of all kinds of cultures and people, just like us. We are all citizens of the school and world, and our diversity makes us special.

Upon entering our school, all teachers, students, parents, and visitors are immersed in a multicultural atmosphere. The colourful mural of children (painted by previous students) on the wall, along with the poster above it, communicate our appreciation of the diverse cultures in our student population and the world, in general. Discussion generated about the importance and meaning of the words and images was very rich, enlightening, and for many, reaffirming of their individual place within the whole of the school-we all belong. Now every time we walk by, children not only look but realize the meaning and importance of what they are seeing.

This activity connects to the foundation of global citizenship as the children are able to see themselves in the images of the mural. They recognize the diversity amongst themselves and were able to connect the variety of student cultures in our one school to the different colours and textures of the peels on the one apple. They also made links to the world, in general. They understand that all of the children are interconnected within our school just like our world is made up of all kinds of cultures and people, just like us. We are all citizens of the school and world, and our diversity makes us special.

We read and discussed the book Every Day is Malala Day. Most students were not aware that girls are treated differently than boys in some parts of the world and that not all children are able to receive an education like they do. They were also shocked by the violence used to stop one brave girl from speaking out about this injustice. The students wrote letters to Malala to express their feelings about what happened to her, to show support for her cause, and to tell her why they think what she is doing is so important to people everywhere in the world. This activity connects to global citizenship because it helps children to see the social injustice that exists in our world and that it can have direct impact on children their own age. By discussing the importance of Malala's cause, students are able to relate their thoughts and feelings to the situation as well as make connections to their own lives. Many of the boys said they would not think it fair that they be able to get an education and their sisters not. It also helps to show how Malala is trying to make a change by speaking out and writing about her experience in hopes of challenging, and eventually changing, the inequality that exists against girls in our world.

We read and discussed the book Every Day is Malala Day. Most students were not aware that girls are treated differently than boys in some parts of the world and that not all children are able to receive an education like they do. They were also shocked by the violence used to stop one brave girl from speaking out about this injustice. The students wrote letters to Malala to express their feelings about what happened to her, to show support for her cause, and to tell her why they think what she is doing is so important to people everywhere in the world.

This activity connects to global citizenship because it helps children to see the social injustice that exists in our world and that it can have direct impact on children their own age. By discussing the importance of Malala's cause, students are able to relate their thoughts and feelings to the situation as well as make connections to their own lives. Many of the boys said they would not think it fair that they be able to get an education and their sisters not. It also helps to show how Malala is trying to make a change by speaking out and writing about her experience in hopes of challenging, and eventually changing, the inequality that exists against girls in our world.

We read the book One Green Apple, which addresses a child’s experience living in a new country where she doesn’t speak the language or know the culture. One of my students is a new addition to the class and country and is limited in her knowledge of the English language. Discussion allowed children to better understand how she may feel in our classroom and the importance of their words and actions in showing her acceptance and friendship. We then connected the symbolism of the one green apple being added to all the big red apples to make the cider in the book. Children could all relate to the theme of being left out, so they wrote about a time when they felt like “one green apple”. This activity connects to global citizenship because it helps children to relate their experiences to those of another child from a different culture. Many students didn’t think they could relate to the new student’s situation, however, when looking at the common theme of feeling “left out”, they were able to make personal connections. It also helps children to think critically about the ways that people from all over the world are the same and different and that, more often than not, we can make a similar connection to their thoughts, feelings, and experiences.

We read the book One Green Apple, which addresses a child’s experience living in a new country where she doesn’t speak the language or know the culture. One of my students is a new addition to the class and country and is limited in her knowledge of the English language. Discussion allowed children to better understand how she may feel in our classroom and the importance of their words and actions in showing her acceptance and friendship. We then connected the symbolism of the one green apple being added to all the big red apples to make the cider in the book. Children could all relate to the theme of being left out, so they wrote about a time when they felt like “one green apple”.

This activity connects to global citizenship because it helps children to relate their experiences to those of another child from a different culture. Many students didn’t think they could relate to the new student’s situation, however, when looking at the common theme of feeling “left out”, they were able to make personal connections. It also helps children to think critically about the ways that people from all over the world are the same and different and that, more often than not, we can make a similar connection to their thoughts, feelings, and experiences.

Our Youth Ambassador, Noha Shehata, came to our grade 2 classrooms and presented on the topic of Climate Change. She engaged the students in learning about the effects of global warming and the role we can play in helping the environment. She asked lots of questions, challenged the students thinking, and evaluated their knowledge and learning at the end of the presentation. The children were very engaged and enjoyed sharing their knowledge about the topic.   This activity relates to global citizenship because knowledge is key to awareness and change. Children need to understand the effects of climate change on the world so that they will realize the importance of their role in helping to protect and preserve the environment. Even as children, they have a role to play and can help to make a difference.

Our Youth Ambassador, Noha Shehata, came to our grade 2 classrooms and presented on the topic of Climate Change. She engaged the students in learning about the effects of global warming and the role we can play in helping the environment. She asked lots of questions, challenged the students thinking, and evaluated their knowledge and learning at the end of the presentation. The children were very engaged and enjoyed sharing their knowledge about the topic.  

This activity relates to global citizenship because knowledge is key to awareness and change. Children need to understand the effects of climate change on the world so that they will realize the importance of their role in helping to protect and preserve the environment. Even as children, they have a role to play and can help to make a difference.

In celebration of Pink Shirt Day, all students were encouraged to wear the color pink. All classes focused on activities that involved reading, writing, viewing, and sharing experiences related to bullying. Bringing experiences to the forefront helps children to identify, relate, understand, and think about how they can help solve such issues for themselves and others. They also wrote positive anti-bullying messages on miniature pink shirts that were displayed in the hallways all around the building. This activity connects to global citizenship because it reinforces the importance of acceptance of people's differences as well as the need for people to not only stand up for themselves, but to stand up for others as well. This is extremely important in a school, and world, where we want children and adults to embrace the differences rather than discriminate against them.

In celebration of Pink Shirt Day, all students were encouraged to wear the color pink. All classes focused on activities that involved reading, writing, viewing, and sharing experiences related to bullying. Bringing experiences to the forefront helps children to identify, relate, understand, and think about how they can help solve such issues for themselves and others. They also wrote positive anti-bullying messages on miniature pink shirts that were displayed in the hallways all around the building.

This activity connects to global citizenship because it reinforces the importance of acceptance of people's differences as well as the need for people to not only stand up for themselves, but to stand up for others as well. This is extremely important in a school, and world, where we want children and adults to embrace the differences rather than discriminate against them.

We watched a couple of you tube videos about Global Citizenship and brainstormed what it meant to be a citizen not only of our community, city, and country, but of the world, in general. We then made a list of key words that were highlighted in the video and discussed what they meant as well as how we can participate/contribute to becoming a better global citizen. This activity directly relates to the concept of global citizenship because it helps young children to understand the idea that all people, of all ages, can help contribute to making the world a better, happier, stronger, more protected, and sustainable place to live and grow. The key phrase that was repeated in one of the videos was that "WE ARE ALL CONNECTED". It has become our mantra throughout this unit!

We watched a couple of you tube videos about Global Citizenship and brainstormed what it meant to be a citizen not only of our community, city, and country, but of the world, in general. We then made a list of key words that were highlighted in the video and discussed what they meant as well as how we can participate/contribute to becoming a better global citizen.

This activity directly relates to the concept of global citizenship because it helps young children to understand the idea that all people, of all ages, can help contribute to making the world a better, happier, stronger, more protected, and sustainable place to live and grow. The key phrase that was repeated in one of the videos was that "WE ARE ALL CONNECTED". It has become our mantra throughout this unit!

As a school, we have a focus on developing virtues throughout the year. For several weeks, a new virtue is introduced. It is explained on the Monday morning announcements by one of the elementary students and an example is given in order to ensure understanding at all age levels. The virtues are reinforced, complimented, and sometimes rewarded, by all teachers in the school. Virtues are displayed outside the guidance counselor's office in the main hallway. This serves as a reminder throughout the year. This activity connects to global citizenship because it helps children to develop the qualities and character needed to become caring and active citizens in their own community and world. It helps them understand the meaning and importance of being the best person we can be.

As a school, we have a focus on developing virtues throughout the year. For several weeks, a new virtue is introduced. It is explained on the Monday morning announcements by one of the elementary students and an example is given in order to ensure understanding at all age levels. The virtues are reinforced, complimented, and sometimes rewarded, by all teachers in the school. Virtues are displayed outside the guidance counselor's office in the main hallway. This serves as a reminder throughout the year.

This activity connects to global citizenship because it helps children to develop the qualities and character needed to become caring and active citizens in their own community and world. It helps them understand the meaning and importance of being the best person we can be.

We read the story The Water Princess, which is based on the true life experiences of model Georgie Badiel, living in an African village as a child. The students learned that she had to walk many miles every day to just to get water that wasn't even clean or safe to drink. it was a very eye-opening fact that not all children live in nice houses with running water and electricity! This activity relates to global citizenship because it helps to increase awareness of some of the hardships faced by many people around the world. It also helps them to see how children, like themselves, have a lot of responsibility and difficult jobs to do each day in order to help their families, and themselves, to survive. In doing so, they are unable to attend school, play, and live carefree like they are able to do. Again, a very eye-opening story that led to a lot of rich discussion, observations, and realizations.

We read the story The Water Princess, which is based on the true life experiences of model Georgie Badiel, living in an African village as a child. The students learned that she had to walk many miles every day to just to get water that wasn't even clean or safe to drink. it was a very eye-opening fact that not all children live in nice houses with running water and electricity!

This activity relates to global citizenship because it helps to increase awareness of some of the hardships faced by many people around the world. It also helps them to see how children, like themselves, have a lot of responsibility and difficult jobs to do each day in order to help their families, and themselves, to survive. In doing so, they are unable to attend school, play, and live carefree like they are able to do. Again, a very eye-opening story that led to a lot of rich discussion, observations, and realizations.

On Pink Shirt Day, the grade 2s watched a brief Brainpop video and read several books about bullying. Then, they wrote about what bullying meant to them...what it is, what it looks like, and what it feels like. Some children also told of a personal experience and/or what they should do if they, or someone they know, becomes bullied. This activity connects to global citizenship because it helps children to identify what bullying looks and feels like and instils a responsibility to stand up for themselves and others. One of the main reasons people are bullied is because they are different in some way. Bullying relates directly to discrimination and prejudice, which we have also covered when reading books about Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King Jr., and Ruby Bridges.

On Pink Shirt Day, the grade 2s watched a brief Brainpop video and read several books about bullying. Then, they wrote about what bullying meant to them...what it is, what it looks like, and what it feels like. Some children also told of a personal experience and/or what they should do if they, or someone they know, becomes bullied.

This activity connects to global citizenship because it helps children to identify what bullying looks and feels like and instils a responsibility to stand up for themselves and others. One of the main reasons people are bullied is because they are different in some way. Bullying relates directly to discrimination and prejudice, which we have also covered when reading books about Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King Jr., and Ruby Bridges.

As part of our Language Arts program, we read the story Light It Up, which tells of the different cultural celebrations that occur in winter. As a spin off, children participated in various centres: writing about how their culture celebrates with light as well as writing about the facts learned about each cultural celebration, reading books about cultural celebrations, listening to stories about each celebration (Diwali, Chinese New Year, Kwanzaa, etc.), and working with new vocabulary words encountered with the different celebrations. This activity relates to global citizenship because it helps build awareness of the differences and similarities between various cultures and their traditions. As a result, it helps children to understand, appreciate, connect, and respect the traditions and beliefs held in various cultures.

As part of our Language Arts program, we read the story Light It Up, which tells of the different cultural celebrations that occur in winter. As a spin off, children participated in various centres: writing about how their culture celebrates with light as well as writing about the facts learned about each cultural celebration, reading books about cultural celebrations, listening to stories about each celebration (Diwali, Chinese New Year, Kwanzaa, etc.), and working with new vocabulary words encountered with the different celebrations.

This activity relates to global citizenship because it helps build awareness of the differences and similarities between various cultures and their traditions. As a result, it helps children to understand, appreciate, connect, and respect the traditions and beliefs held in various cultures.

We watched the movie The Lorax and the following day, read the book by Dr. Seuss. Children were asked to write what they would do if they were given the last truffula seed. Children explained how they would care for the seed...plant it in soil, give it air, space, sunlight, and love! They also recognized that when the trees grew into a forest again, then the Lorax and all the animals would be able to return and make it their habitat once again.  As a follow -up, we also discussed sustainable and renewable natural resources. This activity relates to global citizenship because it helps children to recognize trees and plants as natural resources that they need to help protect and sustain. Children learn that trees are not only a valuable resource for people, but they also provide habitats for animals and insects.

We watched the movie The Lorax and the following day, read the book by Dr. Seuss. Children were asked to write what they would do if they were given the last truffula seed. Children explained how they would care for the seed...plant it in soil, give it air, space, sunlight, and love! They also recognized that when the trees grew into a forest again, then the Lorax and all the animals would be able to return and make it their habitat once again.  As a follow -up, we also discussed sustainable and renewable natural resources.

This activity relates to global citizenship because it helps children to recognize trees and plants as natural resources that they need to help protect and sustain. Children learn that trees are not only a valuable resource for people, but they also provide habitats for animals and insects.

As a homework assignment, children were asked to track their earth-friendly actions at home for one week. They were also able to add 2 other things they do daily to protect the earth and its resources. This activity directly related to global citizenship because it not only shows children little things they can do several times a day, every day, that help the environment but also encourages them to think and act in consciously responsible ways. These actions help them to become a better global citizen.

As a homework assignment, children were asked to track their earth-friendly actions at home for one week. They were also able to add 2 other things they do daily to protect the earth and its resources.

This activity directly related to global citizenship because it not only shows children little things they can do several times a day, every day, that help the environment but also encourages them to think and act in consciously responsible ways. These actions help them to become a better global citizen.

Every day, for the past 2 weeks, we have been reading, discussing, comparing, and contrasting our school practices with those of other countries. We read one section a day in the book\: It's Back To School We Go, which tells a story about a child getting ready for and experiencing their first day of school. On the accompanying page, several facts are stated about school-related traditions in that country. Children are fascinated that school is not the same everywhere....some children go to school 6 days a week, whereas other children may get off school at 12 noon every day. This activity relates to global citizenship because it helps children to see how they are alike/different from children in other cultures and counties. However, the focus here is on school-related traditions and practices. The children are intrigued by the differences and enjoy choosing which country's traditions they prefer/disagree with and why.

Every day, for the past 2 weeks, we have been reading, discussing, comparing, and contrasting our school practices with those of other countries. We read one section a day in the book\: It's Back To School We Go, which tells a story about a child getting ready for and experiencing their first day of school. On the accompanying page, several facts are stated about school-related traditions in that country. Children are fascinated that school is not the same everywhere....some children go to school 6 days a week, whereas other children may get off school at 12 noon every day.

This activity relates to global citizenship because it helps children to see how they are alike/different from children in other cultures and counties. However, the focus here is on school-related traditions and practices. The children are intrigued by the differences and enjoy choosing which country's traditions they prefer/disagree with and why.

Our ACIC Youth Ambassador, Noha, presented about Climate Change to both English and French classes in Grade 4 and again, with one of the Grade 5 classes. The students were very attentive to the information presented and had much to offer during the discussion. This activity relates to global citizenship because it not only increases the students awareness of global issues, but also helps children to see many of the ways they can contribute to the betterment of our world.

Our ACIC Youth Ambassador, Noha, presented about Climate Change to both English and French classes in Grade 4 and again, with one of the Grade 5 classes. The students were very attentive to the information presented and had much to offer during the discussion.

This activity relates to global citizenship because it not only increases the students awareness of global issues, but also helps children to see many of the ways they can contribute to the betterment of our world.

Students watched a Brainpop Jr video about Natural Resources and then listened to the book: Protect Our World, which is part of the Grade 2 Social Studies Program. We brainstormed natural resources and then the children had to choose one resource and identify 4 ways to preserve or conserve that resource. This activity relates to global citizenship because it helps children to understand what natural resources are and why it is important for us to protect and care for them. It also allows them to think of things that they already do (or could start doing) that would help the environment.

Students watched a Brainpop Jr video about Natural Resources and then listened to the book: Protect Our World, which is part of the Grade 2 Social Studies Program. We brainstormed natural resources and then the children had to choose one resource and identify 4 ways to preserve or conserve that resource.

This activity relates to global citizenship because it helps children to understand what natural resources are and why it is important for us to protect and care for them. It also allows them to think of things that they already do (or could start doing) that would help the environment.

We are interested in the Act 4 Global Change Challenge in order to further promote awareness, education, and action in terms of community and global issues. This challenge offers us an opportunity to focus not only on what is happening in our world, but also on how we can contribute to positive change. Our goal is to nurture informed and active global citizens that will positively impact our world in the future.